Cetaceans of the Canary Islands

posted in: Fauna, Sea | 0

Balaenoptera edeni

 

Cetaceans of the Canary Islands are very present in the archipelago all year long. Therefore, these islands have peculiar characteristics that make them very suitable for the observation of Cetaceans.
At least 29 species of this order are reported in its waters.

One of the factors that guarantees the richness of this species is related to the considerable depth reached by these waters. The second main factor of this abundance of species is due to the fact that the Canary Archipelago marks the boundary between the cold waters of the North Atlantic and the warm waters of the south.

Therefore, in the Cetaceans of the Canary Islands we find both species that prefer cold waters and tropical waters.
In addition, the currents that cover the Archipelago guarantee these animals a large amount of food, attracting them in its waters.

So let’s knowing the species of Cetaceans of the Canary Islands more frequents:

Ziphius cavirostris
Ziphius cavirostris
Steno bredanensis
Steno bredanensis
Stenella frontalis
Stenella frontalis
Sperm whales
Sperm whales
Pseudorca crassidens
Pseudorca crassidens
Orcinus orca
Orcinus orca
Megaptera novaeangliae
Megaptera novaeangliae
Lagenodelphis hosei
Lagenodelphis hosei
Kogia breviceps
Kogia breviceps
Globicephala melas
Globicephala melas
Delphinus delphis
Delphinus delphis
Balaenoptera physalus
Balaenoptera physalus
Balaenoptera acutorostrata
Balaenoptera acutorostrata

Eubalaena glacialis

Megaptera novaeangliae

Balaenoptera physalus

Balaenoptera musculus

Balaenoptera edeni

Balaenoptera borealis

Balaenoptera acutorostrata

Physeter macrocephalus

Ziphius cavirostris

Mesoplodon mirus

Mesoplodon europaeus

Mesoplodon densirostris

Hyperoodon ampullatus

Kogia breviceps

Kogia sima

Tursiops truncatus

Steno bredanensis

Stenella frontalis

Stenella coeruleoalba

Pseudorca crassidens

Orcinus orca

Lagenodelphis hosei

Grampus griseus

Globicephala melas

Globicephala macrorhynchus

Delphinus delphis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally we remember that the cetaceans are marine mammals. Evolved from terrestrial ancestors (similar to dog) 53 million years ago.
These evolved to the aquatic life developing hydrodynamic forms and losing the pelvis and the hind limbs. According to genetic studies, the closest relatives of the cetaceans would be hippos.

Read also: Fauna of the Canary Islands
Read also: Canarian fish life
Read also: Diving in Tenerife